Category Archives: Culinary Adventure

Food Politics — Discover

Author Marion Nestle, a food and nutrition scholar and recent James Beard Award winner, blogs about the intersection of food systems, public policy, and health.

via Food Politics — Discover

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Hungryroot’s Vegetable-Based Pastas Are Now Available On The West Coast

Does the idea of a transforming vegetables into noodles sound weird but kind of appetizing? Well, that’s what a startup called Hungryroot is offering, and now..

Source: Hungryroot’s Vegetable-Based Pastas Are Now Available On The West Coast

Traveling Spoon, An Airbnb For Home-Cooked Dinners Globally, Launches With $870K In Funding

When abroad in China or India, I sometimes take a couple of hours to seek out a cooking lesson from a local. It’s the way I’ve learned how to make hand-made..

Source: Traveling Spoon, An Airbnb For Home-Cooked Dinners Globally, Launches With $870K In Funding

Launching Startups The Kogi Way: Three Lessons From The Food Truck Pioneer

Many founders ask me for advice on their latest startup. Of all the things I’ve learned, some of the most compelling tips come from starting a business out..

Source: Launching Startups The Kogi Way: Three Lessons From The Food Truck Pioneer

June 4 is National Eggs Benedict Day

Wow! I truly admire the historical facts associated to this special day. It’s definitely so refreshing. Thanks for sharing this masterpiece.

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

www.firsttimerscookbook.com

An American creation with a feather sorted past.

Perfect for almost any meal of the day.

Did you know…

  1. There are conflicting accounts as to the Origin of Eggs Benedict.  Here are some.
  2. In an interview recorded in the “Talk of the Town” column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death, Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, claimed that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon, and a hooker of hollandaise.” Oscar Tschirky, the famed maître d’hôtel, was so impressed with the dish that he put it on the breakfast and luncheon menus but substituted ham for the bacon and a toasted English muffin for the toast.
  3. Craig Claiborne, in September 1967, wrote a column in The New York Times Magazine about…

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May 24 is National Escargot Day

Wow! This is really exhilarating as much as it is audacious. I certainly would mark this date in my diary for future indulgence because I just missed the celebrations by a whisker. Thanks for sharing this remarkable culinary adventure.

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

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Happy National Day

  One of France’s favorite appetizers

Did you know…

  1. Escargot – French – An edible snail, especially one prepared as an appetizer or entree.
  2. The French consume 40,000 metric tons of snails each year.
  3. Heliculture is the science of growing snails for food.
  4. Snails have been eaten as food since at least ancient Roman times. Apicius, the author of the oldest surviving cookbook (1st century B.C – 2 century A.D.) has a recipe for snails in his cookbook.
  5. Restaurants serve about 1 billion snails annually.

Today’s Food History

  • 1686 Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit was born. He developed the Fahrenheit temperature scale, and invented the mercury thermometer.
  • 1883 R.I.P. Gabriel Gustav Valentin. This German-Swiss physiologist was the first to discover the digestive activity of pancreatic juice. (Oh Boy!).
  • 1883 The Brooklyn Bridge opened. It took 14 years to build at a cost of $18 million, and was the longest suspension…

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